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Quality Street is the Latest Covid 19 Victim

Since the 1930’s Quality Street has been an iconic chocolate variety synonymous with festive celebrations and cold nights huddled up around the fire. 

Indeed Quality Street has earned itself the enviable title  of being one of the most beloved brands in the country when it comes to festive confectionary.

The original tins of Quality street were a feast for the eyes and the taste buds.   A delightful variety of chocolates and toffees were wrapped in brightly coloured foil and glistened in their fancy tin palace.  

By the late 1930’s Quality Street was a much loved treat and the fancy tins were being utilised for sewing accessories, buttons and more.  There is no doubt that the quality street tins and plastic tubs are a far cry from the old fashioned tins that cried luxury and variety, but still the popularity of Quality Street has continued and the British public have valiantly munched, crunched and chewed their way through tins of them year in and year out. 

However, Quality Street fans have been recently outraged as a new addition to the Quality Street menu is missing from current tubs. 

Earlier this year, Nestle announced it would be introducing a new Chocolate Caramel Brownie flavoured chocolate to its tubs, but alas coronavirus had other ideas as the pandemic lockdown has delayed the production.

A spokesperson from Nestle said: “In order to keep Quality Street production going during the Covid-19 lockdown period, we made some temporary changes to the way we operated, such as running fewer lines for a time…

As a result, some consumers may find that they do not have all 12 varieties of Quality Street sweets in their mix.”

Well, as Quality Street lovers took to social media platforms to express their disappointment, I couldn’t help thinking that the real disappointment is that the Quality Street of today is a mere shadow of the sweet selection that was launched in the 1930’s. 

  • The original Quality Street selection included eighteen varieties and was a heavenly mixture of:
  • Chocolate Crème
  • Toffee Brazils (The Purple One)
  • Café Au Lait 
  • Carameline – Similar in character to the “Cup” but the Toffee centre is blended with milk and coffee. 
  • Toffee Cup (Now called the Caramel Swirl)
  • Noisette Pate (The Green Triangle)
  •  Milk Chocolate Whirl 
  • Jaffa Chocolate Toffee – A unique combination of Sultanas mixed with toffee and covered with orange milk chocolate. 
  • Quality Street Toffee – A plain toffee that was creamy
  • Almond Toffee – with finely chopped almonds. 
  • Chocolate Toffee Crispets – A combination of a crisp cereal and toffee coated with chocolate. 
  • Valencia Cracknel – The choicest of almonds in the usual Cracknel casing. I must say this was my favourite and I recall it having a bright blue wrapper.
  • Extra Butter Toffee (Toffee Penny) 
  • Almond Extra Butter Toffee – The same toffee with an almond on top. 
  • “Harrogate” Toffee – with distinctive lemon and ginger flavour. 
  • Chocolate Butter Toffee – The same recipe as “Quality Street” Extra Butter Toffee chocolate coated. 
  • Chocolate Butter Toffee Walnut – Again the same toffee but with a walnut added and the combination covered with superfine chocolate. 
  • Cream Caramel – A creamy soft eating caramel. 
  • Vanilla Toffee – with a delicate vanilla flavour. 
  • Golden Ingots (Now called the Toffee Finger) 

Well, I must say that I do not lament the delay of the chocolate caramel brownie from the Quality Street selection, for how can you miss what you have never had, but I miss the cracknell and cannot help but think that the Quality Street menu of today is something that is altogether disappointing. 

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